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Finland often heads the news with articles about its famous education system and how it tops the rankings for educational systems across the globe. So what is it about the education system that is so revolutionary and what else does it have to offer expats considering making it a permanent home? In this blog post we are going to touch on a few fabulous Finnish features:

About education in Finland

An outstanding education system

Today the Finland’s state education system is one of the top systems in the world and the transformation occurred over 40 years ago as part of the country’s economic recovery plan. The transformation results were outstanding and in 2000 the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) revealed that 15- year-old Finnish students were the best young readers in the world.

A gentle start to school

The Finnish school system is very different to the traditional western school system, which plunges children into school from the age of 4. In Finland children don’t start school until they are 7. They are not measured at all for their first six years of education and rarely take exams or do homework until they are well into their teenage years.

In fact, there is only one mandatory standardised test in Finland, which is taken when children are 16. 93% of Finns graduate from highs school and, after finishing school, 66% of the children move onto tertiary education – which is the highest percentage in Europe.

In Finland state schooling is 100% state funded and teachers are required to only spend four hours a day in the classroom and take two hours a week for professional development. Unlike many countries, all teachers in Finland must have a master’s degree, which is fully subsidised.

Happy in Helsinki

Helsinki is Finland’s capital and is home to many expats enjoying a great lifestyle. A shopper’s paradise, it features the latest fashions and designer stores. It is also home to traditional open-air markets where one can shop for organic food and local handicrafts. Helsinki is also home to more than 80 museums and galleries, offering expats vibrant arts, theatre and cultural scene.

Freedom from rush-hour road traffic

Helsinki has an excellent, integrated public transport network that is cost-effective and easy to use. As a result most expats living in Helsinki don’t bother with buying a car. Instead, they buy reloadable travel cards. Unlike many European cities, Helsinki operates an honesty system when boarding trains, trams and the metro – but if you get caught at a random check without a valid ticket, you can face a hefty fine.

A range of leisure and outdoor activities

Helsinki has many recreational and outdoor areas where residents enjoy mountain biking, running, fishing, hiking and golf. During the winter months, most people hit the slopes and enjoy all the skiing opportunities that Finland is famous for.

If you’re planning on immigrating to Finland or investing money offshore and need financial advice, contact us today. We’re here to help you unlock your South African wealth and put you on the path to financial freedom in your new home.
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